More stories from September's issue of THE BEE!


With their water feed line hose hooked up to a container that mixes it with Class A Foam, firefighters drenched timbers cut from the fence and contents of the trash bin, situated behind the PP&R’s Community Music Center, in the Creston-Kenilworth neighborhood.
With their water feed line hose hooked up to a container that mixes it with Class A Foam, firefighters drenched timbers cut from the fence and contents of the trash bin, situated behind the PP&R’s Community Music Center, in the Creston-Kenilworth neighborhood. (Photo by David F. Ashton)

‘Suspicious’ fire in Creston-Kenilworth threatens Community Music Center

By DAVID F. ASHTON
For THE BEE

A fire raging in a trash bin behind the Community Music Center, in the Creston-Kenilworth neighborhood on August 7, brought Portland Fire & Rescue crews to 3350 S. E. Francis Street at 7:21 p.m. that evening.

Of the nine engine and ladder truck companies dispatched, the first to arrive was Engine Company from Hawthorne Fire Station 9, who radioed back as they arrived that it was a Dumpster and fence fire; and that the building was not yet in danger. The Center, now a Portland Parks property, was built originally as one of Portland’s neighborhood fire stations.

Not knowing what was burning in the trash receptacle, firefighters used “Class A Foam” to quench the fire, and also to stop the flames on a heavy wooden fence on the property line behind it. One crew member used a chainsaw to cut the smoldering fence into sections so it could be soaked with foam.

A PF&R Investigator responded a short time later to look into the fire. A neighbor, living directly behind the venerated city music venue, said he suspected arson; but another possibility could be spontaneous combustion, on that 100-degree day. Officially, the fire is still under investigation.



Woodstock residents Mike Morrison and Kellye Bruce have been picking up litter regularly, and are proposing a neighborhood litter cleanup plan – once a month, on the third Thursday.
Woodstock residents Mike Morrison and Kellye Bruce have been picking up litter regularly, and are proposing a neighborhood litter cleanup plan – once a month, on the third Thursday. (Photo by Elizabeth Ussher Groff)

Woodstock volunteer cleanup plan emerges

By ELIZABETH USSHER GROFF
For THE BEE

Litter on the streets: An empty paper coffee cup, a plastic juice cup, a solitary straw, a lost face mask, a shiny candy bar wrapper. And more. We all know what we see every day, especially in our neighborhoods that have businesses, or people living on the streets.

What to do about so much litter? A few people are trying to stay constantly on it. In a four-block area, Gene and Pat Dieringer, the owners of the Woodstock Safeway block and Bi-Mart block, can be seen almost daily at 8 a.m., cleaning up litter, tires, trash, and sometimes even furniture and household items from the sidewalks and premises of those two “super blocks”. And they have done it for years.

Quite a few Inner Southeast Portland neighbors and others throughout the city have joined the local nonprofit “Adopt One Block”, to regularly stroll their block and pick up litter. Some go out alone with a grabber stick; others go in twos. And some of us think we will help pick up litter more than we actually do. Life gets busy.

Kellye Bruce and Mike Morrison, who moved to Woodstock five years ago, have come up with the idea of having a collective monthly litter cleanup in the Woodstock neighborhood.

“Kellye and I started doing river and beach clean-ups in Los Angeles. We hadn't done any in Portland until we looked around during COVID-19 and the shutdown, and saw so much trash. We walk our dogs, and started to see a build-up of trash along the major streets (52nd, Woodstock, Steele, Caesar Chavez [formerly 39th], Holgate, 41st Avenue) and sidewalks, as well as some of the side streets.”  So, they got in touch with SOLVE and started volunteering for bi-monthly cleanups. “It gives you a sense of accomplishment,” remarks Kellye.

Kellye, who is a member of the Woodstock Neighborhood Association and also financial manager for the Friends of the Woodstock Community Center, has been talking for several months about the need to have a regular neighborhood litter cleanup. The emerging plan is for neighbors to go out collectively from 6:30 to 8 p.m. every third Thursday of the month. 

“We thought if we could get people to take a walk with family and friends, we could cover a whole bunch of territory and pick up a whole bunch of trash. Then, if we did it on a regular basis, we could help keep ‘the hood’ cleaner, like we would all like, plus it’s a great way for neighbors to meet up, lend a hand, AND help out (big or small). Plus building up relationships with folks in the community can only help to make the community better and stronger.”    

Mike has contacted Adopt One Block, which has agreed to supply grabber sticks, gloves, and receptacles for volunteers – to be stored at the Woodstock Community Center. 

On September 15th neighbors will gather at the Woodstock Community Center at 6:30 p.m., and the equipment will be distributed to those who want to help. 

If not able to help out on the 15th, neighbors can show up on the third Thursday of October (the 20th) for equipment and to meet other volunteers. Volunteers would then assemble each month at the Woodstock Community Center on S.E. 43rd just north of Woodstock Boulevard, across from Bi-Mart, to choose a route and go out in two’s or in a larger group.

Those living in other neighborhoods are invited to make a similar plan to help Inner Southeast Portland once again to look its best!



Just how the accident took place that destroyed this Toyota, and left it up against the wall of a building on Powell Boulevard, is under investigation.
Just how the accident took place that destroyed this Toyota, and left it up against the wall of a building on Powell Boulevard, is under investigation. (Photo by David F. Ashton)

Hit-and-run collision on Powell Boulevard injures one

By DAVID F. ASHTON
For THE BEE

A crash that could have been fatal took place on Monday evening, August 8, on eastbound Powell Boulevard near S.E. 12th Avenue.

Central Precinct officers who were dispatched to the incident at 10:21 p.m. found a newer model Toyota sedan, with a smashed front end, backed up and over the sidewalk. The vehicle that did the damage was no longer in the area.

Three Portland Fire & Rescue units were dispatched to the scene, as well as an ambulance. A witness stopped to see if the occupants of the Toyota needed help; apparently they were not injured.

A PPB officer at the scene told THE BEE that officers had located what they believed was the other vehicle, but would not disclose the location – but told us, “That driver is being evaluated for medical transport.”

This case remains under investigation. If you can provide additional information about this hit-and-run crash, email it to crimetips@portlandoregon.gov – and be sure to include “Case No. 22-214286”.



Moments before climbing poles for their next event, Brooklyn’s PGE 17th Avenue Portland Service Center team members stopped for a photo: From left, they’re Cody Bell, Hank Williams, and foreman Colten Hevern.
Moments before climbing poles for their next event, Brooklyn’s PGE 17th Avenue Portland Service Center team members stopped for a photo: From left, they’re Cody Bell, Hank Williams, and foreman Colten Hevern. (Photo by David F. Ashton)

Brooklyn neighborhood PGE Linemen compete in ‘Rodeo’

By DAVID F. ASHTON
For THE BEE

At a unique rodeo, held on Saturday, July 23rd, there weren’t any buckin’ broncos, or calves to be roped – but “speed pole climbing” and “hurt-man rescues” are were just two of the competitive challenges in the 2022 “Northwest Lineman Rodeo” that day.

It was held on the far eastern edge of outer East Portland, at the Portland General Electric (PGE) Lineman Substation – that’s their regional training center, as well as a working electricity distribution hub.

Since the last such rodeo, held in 2019, the term “lineman” has been updated to “lineworker” – fitting, because more females are now climbing poles and pulling electrical cable.

“Nevertheless, our event is currently still called the ‘Pacific Northwest Lineman Rodeo’, and this is our 28th annual event,” explained PGE Apprentice Coordinator Dawn Miller, who is a member of its planning committee.

“At this event, competitors show their families and friends what they do day-to-day,” Miller told THE BEE. “Today, lineworkers from Oregon, Washington, Idaho, and other western states are here to compete against one another!”

While these are timed events, Miller pointed out, “The judges are grading primarily on safety. If a competitor does something egregiously wrong, safety-wise, they can be disqualified from that event.”

The judges also have watch carefully to make sure that every step involved in a particular task has been correctly completed – and in the approved sequence, remarked Miller.

Up and down the poles competitors scrambled, seemingly without effort, likely because strapping on their spikes and clambering utility poles is what they do as journeypersons and apprentice lineworkers on a daily basis.

Additionally, vendors set up along the Midway showed crews the latest labor-saving and safety equipment, clothing, and accessories.

“An underlying principle that’s important to us is that all of our proceeds – registration and vendor fees, raffle ticket sales, and donations – all go to support the work of the Oregon Burn Center, as they have from our very first rodeo,” Miller said with pride.

The local trio we followed, Team #112, who work out of the Brooklyn neighborhood’s 17th Avenue PGE Portland Service Center – Cody Bell, Hank Williams, and foreman Colten Hevern – didn’t have time to chat; they were busy that day!

This team competed in the Cutout Installation, High Line Jumper Replacement, Hurt Man Rescue Lineman, Pole Climb with Raw Egg, and Pole Transfer events. Overall, at the end of the day, they scored 494 out of 500 possible points; and ranked ninth out of 21 teams who came to compete from all over the Pacific Northwest.

When you see a lineworker up on a pole, remember that they’ve been trained to keep your electricity on, and do it with precision, speed, and safety. Now, take a moment to see them up a pole in this year’s Lineman Rodeo, in this exclusive BEE video:

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While some firefighters put out the blaze inside the house, smoke was released from the back part of the roof when crews cut holes to provide vertical ventilation.
While some firefighters put out the blaze inside the house, smoke was released from the back part of the roof when crews cut holes to provide vertical ventilation. (Photo by David F. Ashton)

Fire guts house on 72nd in Brentwood-Darlington

By DAVID F. ASHTON
For THE BEE

Several calls by neighbors to the 9-1-1 Center on Tuesday evening, August 16, at 8:08 p.m. about a house on fire at 6911 S. E. 72nd Avenue near Bybee Boulevard dispatched Portland Fire & Rescue crews to the address.

Lents Fire Station 11’s Engine Company back to dispatchers seeing heavy black smoke inside the 600 sq.ft. home – which was built in 1926.

A minute later, Woodstock Fire Station 25’s Engine and Ladder Truck companies pulled up. A Battalion Chief sent some firefighters to look for victims inside the home, while others immediately started fighting the fire.

According to PF&R Public Information Officer Terry Foster, crews entering the home encountered “heavy clutter inside the structure”, complicating the firefight.

By 8:22 p.m. firefighters had knocked down the main body of the fire; however Ladder Truck crew members were still on the roof, cutting holes to make sure the fire was fully out in the attic, and to provide “vertical ventilation” for potentially toxic and combustive gasses.

“At the time of dispatch, an ambulance was also sent to the incident,” Foster told THE BEE. “The resident was evaluated by AMR paramedics, but was not taken to a hospital. Sadly, three cats perished in the fire, and several others are missing.”

A PF&R Fire Investigator was at the scene, primarily examining a rear corner of the residence where the fire was thought to have started. However, the cause is still under investigation.



Robert McCullough, Chair of the Reed College Place Committee, calls for the City of Portland to provide needed maintenance for the Linden Allée in the middle of S.E. Reed College Place. That’s because PBOT owns the trees.
Robert McCullough, Chair of the Reed College Place Committee, calls for the City of Portland to provide needed maintenance for the Linden Allée in the middle of S.E. Reed College Place. That’s because PBOT owns the trees. (Photo by David F. Ashton)

Eastmorelander seeks city maintenance of Reed College Place ‘Linden Allée’

By DAVID F. ASHTON
For THE BEE

Known by neighbors as the “Gateway to Eastmoreland”, the “Linden Allée” down the middle of S. E. Reed College Place is beloved by residents, visitors, and Reed College students.

This historic grove of Linden trees is planted on a wide and long mid-street strip owned by the Portland Bureau of Transportation (PBOT). However, the Bureau abandoned care of these trees decades ago; and Portland Parks & Recreation’s Urban Forestry division has shown no interest in maintaining this stand of trees, despite the city’s decision to replace its support of the productive nonprofit “Friends of Trees” with its own tree-oriented city services.

That’s what Robert McCullough, the Chair of the Reed College Place Committee, reminded THE BEE in mid August.

“I met with Portland Mayor Ted Wheeler not long ago; I’ve advised our mayors for about twenty years on issues of finance and energy,” McCullough began. “When our discussion turned to ‘global warming’ and trees, I said, ‘I maintain 257 of your trees’.”

“Why do you do that?” Mayor Wheeler asked of him.

“Because you don’t!” McCullough responded – explaining the ongoing plight of the historic Linden Allée, seemingly abandoned by the City of Portland.

“The Mayor instructed Bobby Lee – his Chief of Staff, who was also at the meeting – to send off a note to Commissioners Carmen Rubio and Jo Ann Hardesty about the issue. They are, respectively, the Commissioners of Portland Parks & Recreation, and the Portland Bureau of Transportation.

He received an encouraging response from staff members at first: “Actually, it was the best response I’ve received working with the City of Portland.

“But the next day I got a ‘dismissive’ letter from PF&R’s Urban Forestry department,” McCullough recalled.

“After a long silence, there was some good news: PBOT staff – sort of the villain of the piece, because they own the land and trees, but have no plans for taking care of them – said they were coming to tour Reed College Place on August 9.

“However, “things came up,” McCullough said, and that meeting was postponed until August 19 – after the deadline for the current issue of THE BEE, so we can’t tell you here whether the meeting happened, or what might have come of it if it did.

“Here’s the thing: These trees should be therapeutically pruned once every decade,” McCullough told THE BEE. “We’ve done a very detailed audit with a professional arborist, and we know we currently have sixty trees that need to be cared for.”

While McCullough says he hopes that the City of Portland will step up and take care of their trees, he conceded, with an air of resignation, “Hope is not a strategy.

“Otherwise, we’ll have to come up with about $100,000, by knocking on doors and asking neighbors to contribute to the project.”

He welcomes comments about this situation from neighbors, and he can be reached by email at – Robert@mresearch.com



What remains after this crash on Powell Boulevard beside Creston Park was a crushed bicycle, at the feet of the officer at left, and a crumpled Chevy Tahoe.
What remains after this crash on Powell Boulevard beside Creston Park was a crushed bicycle, at the feet of the officer at left, and a crumpled Chevy Tahoe. (Photo by David F. Ashton)

‘Serious crash’ injures teen cyclist; closes Powell Blvd

By DAVID F. ASHTON
For THE BEE

A collision between a Chevy Tahoe SUV and a bicyclist on S.E. Powell Boulevard near Creston Park on Tuesday afternoon, August 16, seriously injured the young rider – and closed down westbound traffic along the state highway at about 10:45 a.m.

Four Portland Police Bureau (PPB) officers were sent to the area of S. E. Powell Boulevard and 45th Avenue – beside the St. Ignatius Catholic School yard – and there found an injured teen cyclist, and the smashed up Chevy.

Along with the officers, Woodstock Fire Station 25’s Engine Company crew and two ambulances also pulled up at the scene. After the injured rider was rushed to a local hospital, his crumpled bicycle still lay on the sidewalk, not far behind the SUV.

At first, one westbound lane of S. E. Powell Boulevard was closed; but an hour later, both lanes were closed to traffic at S. E. 49th Avenue. Officers also expanded the crime scene as they looked for evidence on the highway and at the intersection of S. E. 45th Avenue and westward.

The incident grew to include 13 officers, including PPB Traffic Crash Team investigators. Westbound Powell Boulevard remained closed to traffic past 6 p.m. that evening.

“The information we have so far is that a 15-year-old male bicyclist was struck by the vehicle, and suffered serious injuries. However, we don’t know his current condition,” PPB Public Information Officer Sergeant Kevin Allen told THE BEE. “The involved driver remained at the scene; there are no indications of an arrest or citations being written.”

The accident remains under investigation. If you can provide information about it, email it to – crimetips@portlandoregon.gov – and be sure to say it’s about Case No. 22-220499.



The northeast corner of the latest street repainting of Share-It Square in Sellwood features the “Turtle that supports the Earth”, with a whole lot of jellyfish.
The northeast corner of the latest street repainting of Share-It Square in Sellwood features the “Turtle that supports the Earth”, with a whole lot of jellyfish. (Photo by Rita A. Leonard)

Annual Share-It Square street repainting finally done

By RITA A. LEONARD
For THE BEE

After three postponements due to bad weather – one of which led to the repainting of a Sellwood intersection on Clatsop Street instead – on the overcast Saturday of July 23, the annual street painting at Share-It Square was finally completed.

This painted intersection, part of the Village Building Convergence at S.E. 9th Avenue and Sherrett Street, has been a community celebration for a quarter century, focusing on “community building and getting to know your neighbors”.

Co-Coordinators Sarah Heath and Liane White Allahdadi were able to combine the interests of the neighborhood gathered from three earlier meetings this spring. Neighbors started by sharing their values and inspirations – which focused on “playfulness, riding the waves of our life, valuing our connections, and celebrating all creatures of the earth”.

“This year has been pretty intense,” remarked Sarah, “Considering the weather and the limitations of the pandemic; but we're pleased to have finally completed this year’s project.”

Illustrator Liane, whose home is at 8425 S.E. 9th Avenue, featured a “Poetry Post” out in front, combining neighbors' ideas into a story and a central image for the 2022 street painting. Liane's husband, Firooz Allahdadi, commented of the Poetry Post, “We call it an 'illumination station', since it shows the desires of the community, and focuses on everyone's creativity.” About 100 painters of all ages participated in the project throughout the day as the design took shape.

Liane explained the story she had assembled: “In 2021, a phoenix flew around the earth with a red thread to share with people and creatures all over, including in the oceans. Eventually an octopus caught the thread and brought it to a playful mermaid. The mermaid took the thread of connection to all her mystical friends, who agreed to ‘SHARE IT’ with people and creatures all over the earth, to show that we are all connected.

“The red thread was carried to the Unicorn of Peace, the Lion of Courage, and to the Turtle that supports the Earth. They, in turn, sent the thread to beings of all kinds, who learned to care for each other with great happiness.”

At the end of this year's painting session, all the painters gathered around the image, each wearing a bit of the red thread described in the story. At the end of the session, each person clipped their own piece of red thread, passing scissors on to their neighbor, until the circle was closed.

Miller Paint gave a discount on the traffic marking paint used. Neighbors contributed a variety of pizza, pastries, and fruit and veggie snacks throughout the day.



This KIA appeared to have been caught in the middle of a three-vehicle smashup – the vehicle in front of it left the scene, and is being sought.
This KIA appeared to have been caught in the middle of a three-vehicle smashup – the vehicle in front of it left the scene, and is being sought. (Photo by David F. Ashton)

Daytime McLoughlin Boulevard three-vehicle wreck stalls traffic

By DAVID F. ASHTON
For THE BEE

A three-vehicle smashup along southbound S.E. McLoughlin Boulevard near Umatilla Street closed down traffic on Wednesday, August 10. Central Precinct officers responded at 2:25 p.m. that afternoon. They were soon joined by an ODOT Incident Response truck that briefly stopped all traffic – and then directed drivers to merge into the center lane after the crashed vehicles had been moved to the narrow road margin.

From what could be observed, an older model Ford F-250 pickup truck had rear-ended a KIA subcompact, causing substantial rear-end damage to the small car. This pushed the KIA into the back of the vehicle in front of it, causing it additional front-end damage.

A witness said that front vehicle – a “big black truck” – had driven off after the crash, and disappeared down the road.

Although it was originally dispatched as an injury accident, emergency medical first responders were waved off as PPB officers sorted out the situation. Traffic was disrupted for about three hours during this incident.

Officers are still on the lookout for that “big black truck” which may have stopped, to cause the crash, and which left the scene before officers arrived.



Coming down from Seattle, Hank Cramer sang at the June 11th concert of the Portland Folk Music Society in the Reed neighborhood – which turned out to be the last show of the 2021-22 season.
Coming down from Seattle, Hank Cramer sang at the June 11th concert of the Portland Folk Music Society in the Reed neighborhood – which turned out to be the last show of the 2021-22 season. (Photo by David F. Ashton)

Public, live folk music concerts return this month to Reed neighborhood

By DAVID F. ASHTON
For THE BEE

Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, it’s been difficult for the Portland Folk Music Society to hold their planned concerts. However, the nonprofit organization – based in the Reed neighborhood – did host some programs at the Reedwood Friends Church this spring – with face masks and immunization proof required.

Due to a cancellation, what turned out to be their final show of the season was held on Saturday, June 11.

“In the 43-year history of the Portland Folk Music Society, this has been the most challenging time for us,” remarked Stanley Davis, Concert Committee Chair and Board Member, speaking to THE BEE at the June 11 performance.

“Starting up again this year in January, we were supposed to have five concerts,” Davis reflected. “The January concert got canceled because of COVID – the performer could not get into the U.S. from Canada. Then, due to illness, May’s concert was also canceled.

“But, starting up again this September, we’re scheduling nine concerts this season,” continued Davis. “It’s important to keep this form of music alive, and to keep making folk music accessible for people to hear live in concerts at reasonable prices.”

You can learn more about the Portland Folk Music Society, and check out the planned concerts, online – http://www.portlandfolkmusic.org



At 9:06 a.m., when THE BEE took this photo, firefighters were still spraying hundreds of gallons of water per minute into the by-now burned-out theater building.
At 9:06 a.m., when THE BEE took this photo, firefighters were still spraying hundreds of gallons of water per minute into the by-now burned-out theater building. (Photo by David F. Ashton)

Historic, century-old Roseway Theater destroyed by fire

By DAVID F. ASHTON
For THE BEE

After surviving changes in motion picture distribution and the shifting demographics of movie goers – and the COVID-19 coronavirus pandemic – the historic independent Roseway Theater, built in 1925, was destroyed by fire early Saturday morning, August 6.

Normally, THE BEE would not have covered a fire so far outside Inner Southeast Portland. But there are a few historic businesses elsewhere on the east side of the city which have emotional connections to many in Inner Southeast, and this is surely one of them – not only do many of our residents remember attending a new or older film at this venerable Sandy Boulevard theater, but recently it has been – to the best of our knowledge – one of only two remaining single-screen movie houses showing only first-run films east of the Willamette River. The other, of course, is the Moreland Theater in Westmoreland.

When multiple calls to 911 reported smoke rising from the Roseway Theater just after dawn on that Saturday morning, Portland Fire & Rescue crews were dispatched. At 5:48 a.m. a first arriving fire engine radioed at 7229 N.E. Sandy Boulevard that indeed thick smoke was rising from the 7,000 sq.ft. Roseway Theater.

At 5:59 a.m. a PF&R Battalion Chief called a “Second Alarm”, bringing in additional firefighters and apparatus. Shortly afterward, firefighters forced entry into the building and began searching for the fire – however the floor began to collapse under them, and flames began burning through the roof. This forced crews to get back outside and to fight the fire from the exterior.

At 6:22 commanders called for a “Third Alarm” to bring more firefighters. By this time, firefighters were now fighting this fire with large, high-pressure streams of water sprayed from high above, using nozzles mounted on several raised ladders on Ladder Trucks. Crews also drenched nearby buildings, to keep the fire from spreading to the adjoining businesses

At 7:36 a.m., Portland Bureau of Transportation crews had been called to mitigate the significant water runoff in Sandy Boulevard. By 9:45 a.m. firefighters had knocked down most of the fire, but falling wood and debris were still trapping embers and hot spots inside the building. “That means this fire will be burning for a long time today,” PF&R Public Information Officer Lt. Damon Simmons told reporters.

As many as 85 firefighters responded during the blaze, Lt. Simmons said, adding, “We did not find anyone inside; and there were no reported injuries.” Below this story is a brief BEE video at the scene.

Investigators began searching for the fire’s cause and point of origin later the same day, but fire investigators finally announced on August 22nd that the cause of the fire was electrical in nature, adding, “Further analysis may be required to identify the specific failures which led to this tragedy.  Arson has been ruled out and this fire was accidental in nature”.

PF&R considers the building to be a total loss – unless its owners decide to level and fully rebuild the theater on the site.

It appears that a landmark century-old independent movie theater, to which many in Portland had an emotional attachment, is gone.



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At the edge of the Brentwood-Darlington neighborhood on the evening of August 15th, the intersection of S.E. 82nd Avenue of Roses and Flavel Street was closed for hours, after a motorcycle and a car collided.
At the edge of the Brentwood-Darlington neighborhood on the evening of August 15th, the intersection of S.E. 82nd Avenue of Roses and Flavel Street was closed for hours, after a motorcycle and a car collided. (Photo by David F. Ashton)

Motorcycle crash in Brentwood-Darlington leaves rider with ‘serious injuries’

By DAVID F. ASHTON
For THE BEE

A crash in the intersection of S.E. 82nd Avenue of Roses and Flavel Street on Monday evening, August 15, brought Portland Police Bureau (PPB) officers to the scene at 8:29 p.m.

Officers found a motorcyclist down near the center of the intersection with what officers described as ‘significant injuries’. The motorcycle had slid over the curb and come to rest at the fence outside the Checkered Flag Tavern, in the northwest corner of the intersection.

The involved vehicle, a late-model Audi sedan, was stopped at the curb facing eastbound on S.E. Flavel Street, just east of 82nd Avenue of Roses.

“Officers believed this would be a trauma injury and requested the PPB Major Crash Team to respond,” PPB Public Information Officer Lt Nathan Sheppard reported. “The motorcyclist was transported to an area hospital by ambulance.”

The other driver in the crash remained at the scene and cooperated with the ongoing investigation.

If you have facts to share about this collision with PPB Major Crash Team, email them to crimetips@portlandoregon.gov – and be sure to mention it’s about Case No. 22-219970.



Inside the closed doors of the Advantis Credit Union Woodstock Branch, two East Precinct officers took the bank robbery report.
Inside the closed doors of the Advantis Credit Union Woodstock Branch, two East Precinct officers took the bank robbery report. (Photo by David F. Ashton)

Woodstock branch of Advantis Credit Union robbed

By DAVID F. ASHTON
For THE BEE

Late in the business day on Tuesday, August 16, the Advantis Credit Union branch office on 4235 S.E. Woodstock Boulevard closed abruptly, due to a robbery.

Patrons confronted by the locked door looked puzzled, until East Precinct officers, dispatched for a “Robbery, Priority” call, pulled up in front of the building at 5:25 p.m.

Some searched the neighborhood for the suspect, apparently without avail.

While officers take robbery reports, it’s actually Federal Bureau of Investigation agents who are assigned to work these cases, since deposits are all federally insured. The Portland FBI office declined to provide information.

“We can confirm that this was a ‘bank robbery’; there was a threat of a weapon, involved, but no weapon was displayed,” PPB Public Information Officer Sergeant Kevin Allen told THE BEE.

This case is under active investigation by the FBI, and as always, the bank robber faces the likelihood of a term in federal prison when caught and convicted.



After the rider was rushed away by ambulance from the collision on S.E. Powell Boulevard, his bike and belongings were moved over to the north sidewalk for later safekeeping.
After the rider was rushed away by ambulance from the collision on S.E. Powell Boulevard, his bike and belongings were moved over to the north sidewalk for later safekeeping. (Photo by David F. Ashton)

Bicyclist struck, injured, on Powell Boulevard

By DAVID F. ASHTON
For THE BEE

A man riding a bicycle – and towing a trailer loaded with personal items – was struck while riding across S.E. Powell Boulevard in the middle of a block, just west of 28th Place, late Wednesday afternoon, July 27.

Central Precinct officers were dispatched to the collision at 5:01 p.m., and found a rider down near the center of the highway.

Woodstock Fire Station 25’s Engine Company arrived to provide emergency medical support until ambulance paramedics took over, before leaving westbound – likely to OHSU – for evaluation and treatment of the victim.

“Witnesses said the bicycle rider was swerving through traffic as he crossed the street, and was ‘bumped’ by a vehicle, causing him to crash,” a PPB officer at the scene told THE BEE. “The driver stayed at the scene, and cooperated with the investigation.”

There is no word on how the bicycle rider might be doing, but he was not thought to have received any serious injuries.




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